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(Undid revision 1367414 by Bruce Bringo (talk))
 
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It was a Tuesday, I can't remember the date but it was a few years ago now. I'd just got off work and I was stopping by the regular market. A quaint store just down the road from my place. I got all the necessities and was on my way to the counter when it caught my eye, a box of Fruit Loops. Glimmering under light from the white bulbs, at an absolute steal of a price. $2 dollars, for a 500g box, it was a miracle. A once in a lifetime deal, something humankind would ever see again. So I bought two boxes of God's cereal and headed for home.
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A man worked alone at a light-house with his fifteen year-old son. One stormy night, he realized he was in dire need of supplies - food, water, propane for the generator - and decided to head into town. Since the man lived twenty miles from the nearest neighbor and thirty from the nearest store, he thought that it would be best to leave his son alone. He told his son to be safe, to lock the door, and to stay in his room where it was safe.
   
I placed the boxes on the bench, looking over the receipt. I still couldn't believe how cheap they were. This thought stayed with me as I packed away the rest of my groceries and had dinner. I couldn't take my eyes off the boxes, they called to me, like some unattainable goal I would never reach. My mouth watered at the thought of ingesting their sugary goodness. I had a shower and went to bed, dreaming of tomorrow morning when I would be able to eat the loops.
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When he had driven almost thirteen miles, he saw a single cloaked figure standing on a hill. He could not make out who or what this figure was through the downpour. Eventually, as he drew closer, he noticed a long scythe, and with a crash of lightning, he saw the hooded figure for what it really was. Frozen in fear, the car started to veer off the road. As he managed to regain control, he noticed that the figure was beckoning to him.
   
A loud bump from downstairs woke me in the middle of the night. A solid but meaty thump, like flesh against wood... Except I had tile. I grabbed my 20 gauge and crept into the hall, the dark played tricks on my eyes, the shadows all casting the same fluttering shapes along the walls. I made my way down the stairs, beads of sweat forming on the back of my neck as I approached the floor.
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The man feared more what would happen to his son than himself, so he turned the car around and raced back home. When he got inside, he locked the door and called to his son, weeping. When he found his son, he embraced his fear that this would be the last time he would be able to do so. As he did this, he told his son to remain in his room until he called him or until morning came. Just then the door broke to splinters and the figure walked in. In the dimly-lit room, the man could clearly see the disfigured skull and the long sharp scythe. He knew his time was up and stood to face the figure honorably.
   
I saw it standing there, a horribly deformed eldritch horror. It stood as tall as my ceiling, maybe taller as it hunched over my kitchen bench. It had no legs, a snake-like body clad in leathery white skin. His body forming into a neck and head, with a giant nose and clad in an aged bicycle helmet. A singular arm hoisted a box over its gaping mouth. My Fruit Loops and one box was already empty.
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The figure then spoke, “I am sorry to have frightened you on the road; your time has not yet come.
   
I watched on in horror as it finished my second box of loops and contorted it's horrific body to look at me. "Provide me with loops, brother." I gasped for air, it's oppressive gaze sapped the life from my legs, and the shotgun clattered to the ground. I couldn't move, I couldn't see, but I could think one thing alone. I had to acquire loops.
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Flooded with relief, the man called to his son and asked why the figure had been beckoning to him.
   
And so I write this tale, to tell you about the Long-Nosed Nobody. And if you see the Long-Nosed Nobody, do not fear, just provide him with LOOPS.
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The figure went on to say, “I merely wished to inquire where I might find your son.
   
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{{Cred|Michael A.}}
 
[[Category:Beings]]
 
[[Category:Beings]]
 
[[Category:Vehicles]]
 
[[Category:Vehicles]]

Latest revision as of 03:08, October 3, 2018

A man worked alone at a light-house with his fifteen year-old son. One stormy night, he realized he was in dire need of supplies - food, water, propane for the generator - and decided to head into town. Since the man lived twenty miles from the nearest neighbor and thirty from the nearest store, he thought that it would be best to leave his son alone. He told his son to be safe, to lock the door, and to stay in his room where it was safe.

When he had driven almost thirteen miles, he saw a single cloaked figure standing on a hill. He could not make out who or what this figure was through the downpour. Eventually, as he drew closer, he noticed a long scythe, and with a crash of lightning, he saw the hooded figure for what it really was. Frozen in fear, the car started to veer off the road. As he managed to regain control, he noticed that the figure was beckoning to him.

The man feared more what would happen to his son than himself, so he turned the car around and raced back home. When he got inside, he locked the door and called to his son, weeping. When he found his son, he embraced his fear that this would be the last time he would be able to do so. As he did this, he told his son to remain in his room until he called him or until morning came. Just then the door broke to splinters and the figure walked in. In the dimly-lit room, the man could clearly see the disfigured skull and the long sharp scythe. He knew his time was up and stood to face the figure honorably.

The figure then spoke, “I am sorry to have frightened you on the road; your time has not yet come.”

Flooded with relief, the man called to his son and asked why the figure had been beckoning to him.

The figure went on to say, “I merely wished to inquire where I might find your son.”



Credited to Michael A. 
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