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It was October of 1935 when stories of Gregory DuMois began to circulate. The French neuroscientist had rapidly become the best in his field, implementing the newest and most advanced tools and developing his own methods of operation. He did not graduate from any prestigious university or medical school, but instead learned the practice himself through trial and error at an early age, writing it all down in his little red notebook. His neighbors would recall him sitting on the front porch at a young age, cutting into the heads of small animals and poking around with various utensils. They always believed he was mentally unstable, but once he became an established doctor nobody even thought of questioning his validity.

Monsieur DuMois’ first patient was a young man by the name of Pierre Peppe. Pierre was blind, but believed that DuMois could fix him. After weeks of surgery in DuMois’ laboratory, Pierre walked out able to see. Nobody could figure out why, as nobody was allowed to watch the doctor at work and his now-famous red notebook never left his side.

DuMois’ fame quickly grew, and he completed many operations on the blind and deaf. His skill was unparalleled and his results simply could not be replicated. Doctors and scientists worldwide tried to uncover the mystery of his success, but could not. But as time went on, talk changed from who could learn from him to who would inherit his laboratory and therefore his knowledge. Gregory DuMois was ninety-three years old, and many suspected he would not live much longer. But he continued work and operate until, at age ninety-five, he was shot and killed by a jealous and greedy doctor, John Watkins, who wanted that notebook so badly he would kill for it.

That isn’t the entire story, but authorities don’t really like to talk about the rest of the incident. They knew that John Watkins shot and killed Gregory DuMois, walked into the laboratory, and then headed towards the forest. They knew that he was found in the same forest and had lost his sanity, babbling about bodies and organs and death. He died shortly afterwards. The cops knew that they found multiple dead bodies in the laboratory, all with missing body parts. They knew that all of the dead bodies were reported missing between 1914 and 1956 and were never found. And they knew that almost none of Gregory DuMois’ body was his own, and autopsy reports revealed that his organs, and the organs of his patients, were taken from the young people that he kidnapped all those years ago. And the worst part? He had a son. Franc DuMois, born March 12th, 1988, went missing ten years ago, taking nothing but his father’s red book.



Written by Tortellinilinguini
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