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  • LOLSKELETONS
    LOLSKELETONS closed this thread because:
    old discussion
    12:06, March 5, 2014

    To a varying degree I'm sure growing up we were all affected by local ghost stories. I come from a southern family, my folks grew up near where Jesse James was buried. I grew up hearing those, but the biggest influence on me were the local stories and legends from the small ranching town I grew up in on the Big Island of Hawaii. 

    Where'd you grow up and what kind of stories had the biggest effect on you?

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    • I grew up in Iowa and i've always had weird experiences with entities/ghosts/weird things happening. Once when I was a kid I was laying down and i looked up and noticed my wall, and saw the shadow of a tall man with some kind of hat on walk out of my room, turned around and nothing was there.

      In my teen years I was walking in the forest and started to cross a corn field and in the distance (it was pitch black outside, no city lights around) and saw a large shadow figure walking toward us (i wasnt alone, my friends saw it too) thats just to name a couple that were similar. 

      What about you?

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    • I actually wrote a pasta loosely based around an urban legend which has circulated my town for years.

      The original story was that a market house, used for traveling British salesmen to sell their produce, was ransacked and the goods were stolen, with the market house eventually becoming abandoned. Over the years, it became desolate, deteriorated, and had an eerie presence off of it.

      The legend had it that it was now occupied by a banshee who for one week every year, around Easter, would give everyone in our town strange dreams, remarkably changing weather, and drive the animals crazy. Children my age used to also say they could hear cackling from the house at night time, and that if you threw a stone through the top right window, that the same stone would be thrown back at you a few seconds later.

      Creepy stuff!

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    • Hawaii's got a slew of stories. We have a varient of the Hook Man legend, of course, but a bit more uniquely we have stories of the Night Marchers, which is a procession of kings and soldiers who make their marches out to the battlefield. They are accompanied by torches and drumming, you get out of their way and you don't look at them or they'll kill you. The only way to avoid being killed if you look at them is if you have an ancestor in the procession. Sometimes Gods are also in the procession.

      There's a story where this kid and his folks moved into a new house, and every night he'd leave his bed and lay in a certain spot in the room. He'd do that every night, no matter what they did, eventually they bricked up the spot. That night they saw him floating out of the room as if he were being carried. He stopped at the door and slept the night. They went to the crawlspace under the house and dug in the spot and they found ancient Hawaiian bones. Where his bed was was directly in the path of the night marchers and the spirit of the bones was protecting the child by moving him out of the way. The parents moved his bed to the spot where the bones were and they never had another instance of it happening.

      Back when I was a kid, at 18 months I caught the RSV virus which caused severe scarring in my throat which in turn caused asthma-like symptoms until I was 12. I had to take steroids to control it, which caused extreme audio-hallucinations. I was also a bad sleep walker for many years. My family lives on 4 acres, out in the driveway there's a lot of room and we made a huge mound of dirt around so that car noise could be cut down. But one day I sleep-walked out the door and stood on the little concrete walkway leading in. I saw these shadows darting through the trees and grass on the outsides of the property, and they were making this horrid laughing noise, almost like monkies. It was really bestial. Out at the entrance of our driveway I saw a tall lean man who looked a bit like James Dean would have had he been older. He wore a white t-shirt and a ball cap and suspenders. He glowed lightly and he walked up to me and stood with me on the walkway and rested his big hand on my shoulder. It was my grandpa who'd died nearly 4 years earlier. He scared away whatever those things were, my mom eventually saw me standing out there by myself and brought me back inside.

      I still don't know if it was real or some kind of hallucination. But of all the audio-hallucinations I endured, I never had anything like that happen again.

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    • I grew up in a place called Lhokseumawe, in Aceh, Indonesia.  

      I remembered my mom telling me that I was a spiritual baby who could sense ghosts or apparitions near our house. I would cry, non-stop, all night, if I sense something strange near me. My mom told me I keep looking at the ceiling for no reason.

      We lived near a mangoo tree. Dad told me that tree is a meeting place for devils and ghosts to hang out. He told me that I saw a ghost with a white cloth and long,black hair, called 'kuntilanak'- a popular ghost in Indonesia - near our window. He knew it because my grandma was hushing me to stop crying and saw a weird figure outside the house window. 

      He also told me that people seen a woman walking in our street. The woman was killed by her husband in a brutal way and was left in an abandoned house or something. I can't remember, but the story creeped me out so much.

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    • First of all, how the fuck do you even pronounce that? Growing up in Hawaii I can pronounce most things, but dang.


      Second of all, that's a great story. Have you seen it since?

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    • I live in pensvania (however you spell it) and i get freked out badly.

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    • XXelliekittenXx wrote:
      I live in pensvania (however you spell it) and i get freked out badly.

      You're telling me you live in Pennsylvania? And you don't know how to spell that? The name of the fucking place you live? 

      You're killing me here.

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    • XXelliekittenXx wrote:
      I live in pensvania (however you spell it) and i get freked out badly.

      How the ever loving fuck do you not know how to spell the name of the state you live in?

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    • ImGonnaBeThatGuy wrote:
      XXelliekittenXx wrote:
      I live in pensvania (however you spell it) and i get freked out badly.
      How the ever loving fuck do you not know how to spell the name of the state you live in?

      You get dropped on your head as a child.

      Sweetheart, what are you doing on a website that's centrally for literature? I feel like you'd be far more content with pretty pictures.

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    • My dad was born in a small town in Brazil, and he heard many stories while growing up, some of which he told to me.

      My dad and his brother would always go to sleep before midnight, and if they were awake at midnight, they would cover their fingernails. They did this because my grandfather told them the story of a woman who was transformed into a horse, and when she was transformed into a horse, her head was cut off. The horse now roams the countryside. If the horse were to see you, you would be driven insane. The only way the horse could find you was if you were awake at midnight, and your fingernails were not covered.

      He also told me other folk stories, each story being incredibly strange.

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    • ImGonnaBeThatGuy wrote:
      XXelliekittenXx wrote:
      I live in pensvania (however you spell it) and i get freked out badly.
      How the ever loving fuck do you not know how to spell the name of the state you live in?

      im only 10 and i have only lirned to spell mississippi... in therd grade. IM IN 5TH GRADE!!!

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    • Noothgrush wrote:
      ImGonnaBeThatGuy wrote:
      XXelliekittenXx wrote:
      I live in pensvania (however you spell it) and i get freked out badly.
      How the ever loving fuck do you not know how to spell the name of the state you live in?
      You get dropped on your head as a child.

      Sweetheart, what are you doing on a website that's centrally for literature? I feel like you'd be far more content with pretty pictures.

      10/10 would read again

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    • PrimeInstinct wrote:
      My dad was born in a small town in Brazil, and he heard many stories while growing up, some of which he told to me.

      My dad and his brother would always go to sleep before midnight, and if they were awake at midnight, they would cover their fingernails. They did this because my grandfather told them the story of a woman who was transformed into a horse, and when she was transformed into a horse, her head was cut off. The horse now roams the countryside. If the horse were to see you, you would be driven insane. The only way the horse could find you was if you were awake at midnight, and your fingernails were not covered.

      He also told me other folk stories, each story being incredibly strange.

      That's the most surreal ghost story I've ever heard.

      "Cover your fingernails or the headless horse will drive you insane."

      That's fucking awesome.

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    • XXelliekittenXx wrote:
      ImGonnaBeThatGuy wrote:
      XXelliekittenXx wrote:
      I live in pensvania (however you spell it) and i get freked out badly.
      How the ever loving fuck do you not know how to spell the name of the state you live in?
      im only 10 and i have only lirned to spell mississippi... in therd grade. IM IN 5TH GRADE!!!

      I had a college reading level by the time I was in 5th grade. You have no excuse.

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    • The closest thing my city had to a ghost story was that the old manager of the staples hung himself in his office. And apparently the cleaning people won't go in there after dark now.

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    • I just realized that I've been sitting on a ton of material...About half a mile outside of my hometown, there's the ruin of a monastery/ former robber's den/former castle. According to the legends, during the 30-years-war, after they drove the last nuns out, the women were put in barrels, in which the men drove carpenter's nails, and rolled them down the hillside. Over the centuries, people believed to see the ghosts of nuns pierced by nails in the forests around the place. 

      The place has been around since the 900s, and at least until the 16th century, there's been so much blood spilt there, that I have no problem believing the site to be haunted.

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    • I live in the panhandle of Texas (That's the northern part). There isn't a lot of talk about  "ghosts" or "spirits" given that I'm in the middle of the Bible belt and religious opinions on that matter differ greatly here. However, there is a lot of strange things that go on here. Dissapearing animals, children having strange nightmares, premonitions, and even instances of my friends seeing strange people in their backyards/streets at night. 

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    • I was born and raised in a small town in Ostrobottnia in Finland, we didn't have that many ghost stories, though we got to hear about the Bodom murders, the guy was never caught. We did have this thing about a sea monster that drags children underwater and kills them that lives where there are waterlilies called Näkki. We usually had to come up with our own ghost stories.

      Well... we do have this thing called "Suomalainen sisu" I guess it would be "Finnish spirit" or spunk, guts or balls, whatever. It was invented when there was war to help the troops I guess, it's not a ghost story but it's something every finn knows of. Basically as long as you have sisu you can even go through grey rock. There's even a phrase that says so "Sisu Suomalaisen vie vaikka läpi kiven harmaan" translated: "Finnish spirit takes you through even grey rock" 

      Not sure if it qualifies

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    • This thread peaked my curiosity so I did some research. I decided to look into it and, through talking to various people, this is what I found about my hometown of Lubbock, TX. The first is a story of a doctor that had a practice here about a hundred years ago. The tale goes that he had a deep seated hatred for children. Evidently even the simplest cases of the common cold or a tonsol removal would leave the kids dead. Also, the story goes that orphans in the area started dissapearing and the bodies of babies were found in his backyard. I haven't found any evidence that this actually happened but it makes for a good story.

      The man I talked to about this story says it's real and that it made headlines here. It's called "The Prison Man's House" In the 1940's a man killed his wife. He managed to get a prison sentence rather than the death penalty but due to a loophole in the legal system, he only served ten years. He became so horrified by his own guilt that he built his house into his own personal prison. He covered it with pictures of his wife and even hired someone to be his "warden" and lock him in certain rooms in certain hours. When I asked if where I could find this house, the old man I was speaking to said "I wouldn't tell God himself where this house was." Evidently some psycho decided to buy the place and live there. He changed the interior design to make it more liveable but it is supposedly filled with all kinds of paranormal activity.

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    • TheLongShadow wrote:
      This thread peaked my curiosity so I did some research. I decided to look into it and, through talking to various people, this is what I found about my hometown of Lubbock, TX. The first is a story of a doctor that had a practice here about a hundred years ago. The tale goes that he had a deep seated hatred for children. Evidently even the simplest cases of the common cold or a tonsol removal would leave the kids dead. Also, the story goes that orphans in the area started dissapearing and the bodies of babies were found in his backyard. I haven't found any evidence that this actually happened but it makes for a good story.

      The man I talked to about this story says it's real and that it made headlines here. It's called "The Prison Man's House" In the 1940's a man killed his wife. He managed to get a prison sentence rather than the death penalty but due to a loophole in the legal system, he only served ten years. He became so horrified by his own guilt that he built his house into his own personal prison. He covered it with pictures of his wife and even hired someone to be his "warden" and lock him in certain rooms in certain hours. When I asked if where I could find this house, the old man I was speaking to said "I wouldn't tell God himself where this house was." Evidently some psycho decided to buy the place and live there. He changed the interior design to make it more liveable but it is supposedly filled with all kinds of paranormal activity.

      Fascinating. The local library should have public records of the incident. 

      I feel like there in the Panhandle there ought to be enough local history to constitute more stories in the realm of ghosts. My mom comes from the bible belt as well, but there're a plethora of local legends and stories.

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