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  • Despite the fact that the original of the 2008th was never published on this site, I think many have heard about this story. What do you think about it?

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    • I wish it were the one that became popular instead of that Mary Sue story we got.

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    • It was a good example of how low our standards were back in those days. Not a good story, but I think the main reason it blew up so much was because of this picture:

      Jeff

      You see a pattern in old creepypasta where the classic stories are always accompanied by a somewhat unnerving image (e.g. Smile Dog, The Expressionless, Slenderman, Squidward's Suicide, The Rake, etc.)

      I haven't read the 'new' version of Jeff the Killer, so I don't really know what it's all about. But the creepy images always seemed to boost a story's popularity, sometimes even becoming iconic. There's no way Jeff the Killer would be such a staple of early 2000s internet culture if that image of the smiling white face never existed.

      Like I said, Jeff the Killer isn't a good story by today's standards. It's choppily written, gore is just kind of thrown in for added shock value, and the plot is questionable. But back in that era, it scared the shit out of people. And most modern pastas, however well written, however good they are overall, will never quite achieve that same effect on people in my eyes. I do think this is mainly because of the fall of creepypastas' popularity. In a way, it is a dying internet culture, not fit for movies or TV as we have seen in the recent Slenderman movie and Channel Zero's adaptations.

      But who knows, maybe creepypasta will make a comeback within the next decade or so. All it would take is one breakthrough story.

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    • Just a Guy That Likes Creepypastas wrote:
      It was a good example of how low our standards were back in those days. Not a good story, but I think the main reason it blew up so much

      was because of this picture:

      Jeff

      You see a pattern in old creepypasta where the classic stories are always accompanied by a somewhat unnerving image (e.g. Smile Dog, The Expressionless, Slenderman, Squidward's Suicide, The Rake, etc.)

      I haven't read the 'new' version of Jeff the Killer, so I don't really know what it's all about. But the creepy images always seemed to boost a story's popularity, sometimes even becoming iconic. There's no way Jeff the Killer would be such a staple of early 2000s internet culture if that image of the smiling white face never existed.

      Like I said, Jeff the Killer isn't a good story by today's standards. It's choppily written, gore is just kind of thrown in for added shock value, and the plot is questionable. But back in that era, it scared the shit out of people. And most modern pastas, however well written, however good they are overall, will never quite achieve that same effect on people in my eyes. I do think this is mainly because of the fall of creepypastas' popularity. In a way, it is a dying internet culture, not fit for movies or TV as we have seen in the recent Slenderman movie and Channel Zero's adaptations.

      But who knows, maybe creepypasta will make a comeback within the next decade or so. All it would take is one breakthrough story.

      Kind of sounds like you're describing the 2011 version that used to be on here, rather than the 2008 version that the OP is talking about.

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    • NedWolfkin wrote:

      Just a Guy That Likes Creepypastas wrote:
      It was a good example of how low our standards were back in those days. Not a good story, but I think the main reason it blew up so much

      was because of this picture:

      Jeff

      You see a pattern in old creepypasta where the classic stories are always accompanied by a somewhat unnerving image (e.g. Smile Dog, The Expressionless, Slenderman, Squidward's Suicide, The Rake, etc.)

      I haven't read the 'new' version of Jeff the Killer, so I don't really know what it's all about. But the creepy images always seemed to boost a story's popularity, sometimes even becoming iconic. There's no way Jeff the Killer would be such a staple of early 2000s internet culture if that image of the smiling white face never existed.

      Like I said, Jeff the Killer isn't a good story by today's standards. It's choppily written, gore is just kind of thrown in for added shock value, and the plot is questionable. But back in that era, it scared the shit out of people. And most modern pastas, however well written, however good they are overall, will never quite achieve that same effect on people in my eyes. I do think this is mainly because of the fall of creepypastas' popularity. In a way, it is a dying internet culture, not fit for movies or TV as we have seen in the recent Slenderman movie and Channel Zero's adaptations.

      But who knows, maybe creepypasta will make a comeback within the next decade or so. All it would take is one breakthrough story.

      Kind of sounds like you're describing the 2011 version that used to be on here, rather than the 2008 version that the OP is talking about.

      Eh, I haven't read any version in quite a while so I probably am. Is the 2008 version much better or something?

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    • I found this page giving a history of the character:

      https://villains.fandom.com/wiki/Jeff_the_Killer#Publication_History

      Apparently Go To Sleep came before the actual Jeff the Killer story that most are familiar with and which KBK adapted for his rewrite in 2015.

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    • "wiki user GameFuelTv, posted a story (written by his brother) onto the Creepypasta wiki."


      Read: The kid who wrote the story was too young to register an account with the wiki.

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    • I like Jane the Killer. Does anybody know the Jeff the Killer pasta link anywhere so I can read it?

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    • Popstar792 wrote:
      I like Jane the Killer. Does anybody know the Jeff the Killer pasta link anywhere so I can read it?

      If you mean the 2011(?) version, it is right here

      Jane the Killer (in case you are looking for it)

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    • NedWolfkin wrote:

      Popstar792 wrote:
      I like Jane the Killer. Does anybody know the Jeff the Killer pasta link anywhere so I can read it?

      If you mean the 2011(?) version, it is right here

      Jane the Killer (in case you are looking for it)

      Yay! Ty!

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    • Popstar792 wrote:

      NedWolfkin wrote:

      Popstar792 wrote:
      I like Jane the Killer. Does anybody know the Jeff the Killer pasta link anywhere so I can read it?
      If you mean the 2011(?) version, it is right here

      Jane the Killer (in case you are looking for it)

      Yay! Ty!

      You're welcome.

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    • You know, I feel Jeff the Killer would work more if we deconstructed the character, making him this vaguely supernatural figure.

      I really like Jane the Killer though. Find her a more interesting character. Jeff strikes me as just a psychotic nutjob, while Jane feels more tragic.

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    • Just a Guy That Likes Creepypastas wrote:
      It was a good example of how low our standards were back in those days. Not a good story, but I think the main reason it blew up so much was because of this picture:

      Jeff

      You see a pattern in old creepypasta where the classic stories are always accompanied by a somewhat unnerving image (e.g. Smile Dog, The Expressionless, Slenderman, Squidward's Suicide, The Rake, etc.)

      I haven't read the 'new' version of Jeff the Killer, so I don't really know what it's all about. But the creepy images always seemed to boost a story's popularity, sometimes even becoming iconic. There's no way Jeff the Killer would be such a staple of early 2000s internet culture if that image of the smiling white face never existed.

      Like I said, Jeff the Killer isn't a good story by today's standards. It's choppily written, gore is just kind of thrown in for added shock value, and the plot is questionable. But back in that era, it scared the shit out of people. And most modern pastas, however well written, however good they are overall, will never quite achieve that same effect on people in my eyes. I do think this is mainly because of the fall of creepypastas' popularity. In a way, it is a dying internet culture, not fit for movies or TV as we have seen in the recent Slenderman movie and Channel Zero's adaptations.

      But who knows, maybe creepypasta will make a comeback within the next decade or so. All it would take is one breakthrough story.

      The Expressionless is considered a classic creepypasta now? Wat

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    • KingSparta300 wrote:
      You know, I feel Jeff the Killer would work more if we deconstructed the character, making him this vaguely supernatural figure.

      I doubt it. Nothing could make this work. Since we already have a remake on here, that is unlikely to happen anyway.

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    • NedWolfkin wrote:

      KingSparta300 wrote:
      You know, I feel Jeff the Killer would work more if we deconstructed the character, making him this vaguely supernatural figure.

      I doubt it. Nothing could make this work. Since we already have a remake on here, that is unlikely to happen anyway.

      Shame. Though Jane could have a reworking. Way more interesting character.

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    • NedWolfkin
      NedWolfkin removed this reply because:
      Incorrect statement.
      02:12, April 9, 2019
      This reply has been removed
    • NedWolfkin
      NedWolfkin removed this reply because:
      02:12, April 9, 2019
      This reply has been removed
    • LOLSKELETONS wrote:

      Just a Guy That Likes Creepypastas wrote:
      It was a good example of how low our standards were back in those days. Not a good story, but I think the main reason it blew up so much was because of this picture:

      Jeff

      You see a pattern in old creepypasta where the classic stories are always accompanied by a somewhat unnerving image (e.g. Smile Dog, The Expressionless, Slenderman, Squidward's Suicide, The Rake, etc.)

      I haven't read the 'new' version of Jeff the Killer, so I don't really know what it's all about. But the creepy images always seemed to boost a story's popularity, sometimes even becoming iconic. There's no way Jeff the Killer would be such a staple of early 2000s internet culture if that image of the smiling white face never existed.

      Like I said, Jeff the Killer isn't a good story by today's standards. It's choppily written, gore is just kind of thrown in for added shock value, and the plot is questionable. But back in that era, it scared the shit out of people. And most modern pastas, however well written, however good they are overall, will never quite achieve that same effect on people in my eyes. I do think this is mainly because of the fall of creepypastas' popularity. In a way, it is a dying internet culture, not fit for movies or TV as we have seen in the recent Slenderman movie and Channel Zero's adaptations.

      But who knows, maybe creepypasta will make a comeback within the next decade or so. All it would take is one breakthrough story.

      The Expressionless is considered a classic creepypasta now? Wat

      When I say 'classic' I don't necessarily mean it's good.

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    • Just a Guy That Likes Creepypastas wrote:
      When I say 'classic' I don't necessarily mean it's good.

      It just strikes me as weird because I always thought of it as a relatively 'new' pasta, but I guess it is a little over half a decade old at this point. Its lasting popularity still perplexes me. Probably something to do with the image, as you observed.

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    • so for your understand, here is the profile of the author of Jeff, where he posts all the info: https://www.deviantart.com/sesseur

      Immediately I want to share my opinion: the original Jeff is bullshit

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    • Honestly, I want to write my own version of Jeff the Killer just for the challenge of it.

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    • KingSparta300 wrote:
      Honestly, I want to write my own version of Jeff the Killer just for the challenge of it.

      If you did, where would you put it?

      Like I said, there is already a Jeff remake on here, and even if there weren't it would be against the rules to post it.

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    • NedWolfkin wrote:
      KingSparta300 wrote:
      Honestly, I want to write my own version of Jeff the Killer just for the challenge of it.
      If you did, where would you put it?

      Like I said, there is already a Jeff remake on here, and even if there weren't it would be against the rules to post it.

      I've been trying to set up a blog for a long time. If I got it running, I'd put it on there.

      Maybe my Tumblr? Don't use that for much.

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    • CreepEvan26 wrote:
      Despite the fact that the original of the 2008th was never published on this site, I think many have heard about this story. What do you think about it?

      The 2008 version I hardly know about. I do remember watching some things about it, though. I think Just a Guy had a point in saying that that image popularly affiliated with it is what brought it so much attention. Although, to be honest, I really have no idea why everyone thinks Creepypasta is losing popularity. In my opinion, the internet is a little "saturated" with it and people became a bit tired of it. That tends to happen with everything pop-culture. Eventually, if Creepypasta plays its cards right, it'll get a resurgence in popularity. 

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    • CreepEvan26 wrote: so for your understand, here is the profile of the author of Jeff, where he posts all the info: https://www.deviantart.com/sesseur

      Immediately I want to share my opinion: the original Jeff is bullshit

      Now I will try to explain my vision: Jeff the Killer is a natural Mary Sue and a copypaste of the characters. The author does not have so much fantasy that he transferred himself to the character, only by making him supposedly a "superhero." Still, if you look in a profile, you will see that Jeff has a whole Universe, but also you will notice that the author does not know how to make fictional worlds at all.

      In general, what I want to say: Jeff the Killer is a combination of the talentlessness and laziness of the author, which for some unknown reason has become popular. Against the background of the original Jeff, even a remake of 2011 looks much more elaborate and solid.

      But it just my opinion.

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    • ArmadillooftheAges wrote:

      Eventually, if Creepypasta plays its cards right, it'll get a resurgence in popularity. 

      I doubt that will ever happen. Like we've said, the days of Creepypasta being Creepypasta are long gone. The only thing that is going to attract newcomers is the classics. This is a dying fandom that will only be remembered for the aforementioned classics.

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    • NedWolfkin wrote:
      ArmadillooftheAges wrote:

      Eventually, if Creepypasta plays its cards right, it'll get a resurgence in popularity. 

      I doubt that will ever happen. Like we've said, the days of Creepypasta being Creepypasta is long gone. The only thing that is going to attract newcomers is the classics.

      That some of those classics aren't even good to begin with doesn't reflect that well on creepypasta as a whole.

      I think some of the best classics are the Rake and Candle Cove, but this is about Jeff the Killer. I still really think a reworking that makes the character more supernatural would work better, at least by, say, making him sort of like Michael Myers.

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    • KingSparta300 wrote:

      That some of those classics aren't even good to begin with doesn't reflect that well on creepypasta as a whole.

      I have to strongly disagree. The classics are what brings people in, especially because the newer ones never go viral like they did. Nobody would care about Creepypasta if it weren't for the stories it was built on.

      KingSparta300 wrote:

      I still really think a reworking that makes the character more supernatural would work better, at least by, say, making him sort of like Michael Myers.

      As you've said before.

      As for Michael Myers, he is not a supernatural being. At least as far as I know.

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    • NedWolfkin wrote:
      KingSparta300 wrote:

      That some of those classics aren't even good to begin with doesn't reflect that well on creepypasta as a whole.

      I have to strongly disagree. The classics are what brings people in, especially because the newer ones never go viral like they did. Nobody would care about Creepypasta if it weren't for the stories it was built on.


      KingSparta300 wrote:

      I still really think a reworking that makes the character more supernatural would work better, at least by, say, making him sort of like Michael Myers.

      As you've said before.

      As for Michael Myers, he is not a supernatural being. At least as far as I know.

      I meant vaguely supernatural.

      And the specific classic I refer to it Squidward's Suicide.

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    • NedWolfkin wrote:
      ArmadillooftheAges wrote:

      Eventually, if Creepypasta plays its cards right, it'll get a resurgence in popularity. 

      I doubt that will ever happen. Like we've said, the days of Creepypasta being Creepypasta are long gone. The only thing that is going to attract newcomers is the classics.

      This is a dying fandom that will only be remembered for the aforementioned classics.

      Maybe you're right. What a pity. I feel like there's not much more I can add than what's already been said. I think it's safe to say Creepypasta as we know it is pretty much dying out. 

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    • ArmadillooftheAges wrote:

      Maybe you're right. What a pity. I feel like there's not much more I can add than what's already been said. I think it's safe to say Creepypasta as we know it is pretty much dying out. 

      I see it as an art form that is evolving.

      Some people say that Hollywood movies are dying and that they are all reboots, usually worse than the original. Yes, Hollywood has turned out quickly forgotten drivel in the last ten years. Yet, I can think of several really imaginative films that have come out. Two of my favorites were obscure little indie films made on tiny budgets.

      The days of rebooting Jeff The Killer or spouting some meaningless ritual and getting the Creepypasta audience to buy it are over. It will flop, just as badly as the recent Ghostbusters reboot. To succeed in today's crowded creepypasta marketplace, you need to constantly improve.

      Of course, what is a success in Creepypasta? It's not like I do this for money. It is an art form, a hobby. To me, a successful pasta is where it is the best story I can do at that time. If each story is a little better than the last, I am succeeding.

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    • DrBobSmith wrote:

      ArmadillooftheAges wrote:

      Maybe you're right. What a pity. I feel like there's not much more I can add than what's already been said. I think it's safe to say Creepypasta as we know it is pretty much dying out. 

      I see it as an art form that is evolving.

      Some people say that Hollywood movies are dying and that they are all reboots, usually worse than the original. Yes, Hollywood has turned out quickly forgotten drivel in the last ten years. Yet, I can think of several really imaginative films that have come out. Two of my favorites were obscure little indie films made on tiny budgets.

      The days of rebooting Jeff The Killer or spouting some meaningless ritual and getting the Creepypasta audience to buy it are over. It will flop, just as badly as the recent Ghostbusters reboot. To succeed in today's crowded creepypasta marketplace, you need to constantly improve.

      Of course, what is a success in Creepypasta? It's not like I do this for money. It is an art form, a hobby. To me, a successful pasta is where it is the best story I can do at that time. If each story is a little better than the last, I am succeeding.

      Describing it as an art form that's evolving, to me, is looking at it in a more positive way. That's not necessarily a bad thing, but for old folks like Ned, Skelly, and myself, it kind of kills what we originally loved about them. If you ask me, Creepypasta moving from user-generated text stories on /x/ in the mid-to-late 2000s to Hollywood movies with million-dollar budgets is not really "evolving"; it's more like falling into the hands of corporate executives who want to make a quick buck. So I guess "popularity" would be a better word than evolving. 

      I suppose there exists an argument that, yeah, it's evolving because nowadays most pastas aren't so shoddily-written and tend to have more developed plots and characters. I guess if you want to consider that evolving then that's fine, but when I read Pastas back in the day, it wasn't so much to read an intricate piece of horror literature or like something I'd read in an actual novel. It was to read something cheap, short, and crude but really fun. And also, "Creepypasta marketplace" lol. Sounds more and more like an industry everyday. 

      I've said this numerous times already, but Creepypasta, in my opinion, was always just about having fun by scaring yourself. No standards or anything like that. 

      Side note: To be completely honest, I enjoy movies, but I'm not a voracious movie-watcher, at least not to the extent of some people. I'm more of a literature and show and gaming fan. And I've read and heard several arguments about how people feel that independent works are far more creative and interesting than works being produced by big-name studios. We have to take into consideration the fact that a lot of work produced by major companies is often at the mercy of executive meddling and public relations while independent works tend to be free and more about the creation and making something awesome than hoping it will sell. 

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    • ArmadillooftheAges wrote:
      [...] but for old folks like Ned, Skelly, and myself, it kind of kills what we originally loved about them.

      Don't get me wrong, I still love reading newer pastas, but I do miss that "vibe" of older 4chan-influenced pastas that emphasized anonymity and actually read like honest-to-god urban legends. In my mind, that's what set creepypasta apart from general horror fiction - well, that and the amateurish quality often on display.

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    • LOLSKELETONS wrote:

      ArmadillooftheAges wrote:
      [...] but for old folks like Ned, Skelly, and myself, it kind of kills what we originally loved about them.

      Don't get me wrong, I still love reading newer pastas, but I do miss that "vibe" of older 4chan-influenced pastas that emphasized anonymity and actually read like honest-to-god urban legends. In my mind, that's what set creepypasta apart from general horror fiction - well, that and the amateurish quality often on display.

      My bad. I could've sworn you said you weren't a fan of the newer standards and all that stuff. Yeah, Those qualities are what made the old Pastas so good. 

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    • Since this is getting off topic, I've started a new thread for the debate.

      I'm going to end my say on the Jeff topic by saying I really don't see how making him a supernatural character would work without removing the popular bullied-kid-turns-psycho mythology. Trying to put them both together (supernatural/bullied kid) would just make it look like a parody of Carrie.

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    • ArmadillooftheAges wrote:

      LOLSKELETONS wrote:

      ArmadillooftheAges wrote:
      [...] but for old folks like Ned, Skelly, and myself, it kind of kills what we originally loved about them.

      Don't get me wrong, I still love reading newer pastas, but I do miss that "vibe" of older 4chan-influenced pastas that emphasized anonymity and actually read like honest-to-god urban legends. In my mind, that's what set creepypasta apart from general horror fiction - well, that and the amateurish quality often on display.

      My bad. I could've sworn you said you weren't a fan of the newer standards and all that stuff. Yeah, Those qualities are what made the old Pastas so good. 

      I believe all I said was that this wiki has been "creepypasta" in name only for a very long time. In fact, I've thought that since around 2013, before the current standards were even solidified. An older admin, Mr.Zalgopasta, once suggested that we rename this place to "Horror Writing Wiki" or something along those lines, and to this day I agree with him. Not about literally changing the name (that'd be stupid), but with the general sentiment behind the statement.

      No longer is this site a repository for actual creepypasta; those died at the beginning of the decade, anyway, and we have Historical Archive for those. Now, this wiki is largely a place for amateur horror writers to practice their craft. Whether this is a good or bad change depends on what you're looking for in this wiki, but I'd say it was kind of an inevitable change.

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    • Are you talking about the original Sesusser YouTube video from years ago, back when YouTube was new? Because if you are, it really isn't anything special

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    • DoctorBleed wrote:
      Are you talking about the original Sesusser YouTube video from years ago, back when YouTube was new?

      Yeah. I'm talking about it.

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    • A FANDOM user
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